Dec 022013
 

New Jersey was one of the first states to ban the use of handheld cell phones while driving.  Despite current New Jersey laws against talking on cell phones and texting while driving, drivers are still texting and talking on cell phones while driving on New Jersey roadways.

In an effort to stop drivers from talking or texting while driving, a recently passed New Jersey law is cracking down even further on distracted driving.  In late June of this year, Governor Chris Christie signed a bill that significantly raises fines for NJ drivers who use handheld cell phones or text while driving.  The law will take effect next summer.  *Source: http://handsfreeinfo.com (N.J. stiffens distracted driver fines)

Under the current NJ distracted driving law, it is a secondary offense for drivers to talk or text on cell phones while driving.  This means that the police can only stop distracted NJ drivers for something else first.  Therefore, if a police officer suspects a driver is texting, he cannot stop the driver just for that.  However, if the driver was speeding and also texting while driving, the police officer can stop the driver for speeding and then fine the driver for texting while driving.

The new distracted driving law makes texting or talking on a cell phone while driving a primary offense.  Therefore, if a police officer suspects that a driver is texting or talking on the phone while driving on a NJ roadway, they can stop the driver.

In addition, the new distracted driving law has heftier fines than the current law, which fines drivers $100 for texting or using a handheld cell phone.  The new fine for a first offense under the new law can increase to as much as $400.  For second and third time offenders, the fine can be as high as $600 and $800 respectively.

Hurt in a NJ Car Accident Caused by Cell Phone Use or Distracted Driving – What You Should Know

After a serious car, bus or truck accident caused by a distracted driver who was texting or talking on the phone while driving, injured victims are often overwhelmed and concerned about their medical expenses.

Injured drivers often believe that they have to file a medical claim against the at-fault distracted driver’s car insurance company.  Though that may logically make sense, it is unfortunately not the case.  Injured drivers actually make medical claims with their own car insurance companies because New Jersey is a no-fault state.  That means, regardless of who caused the car accident, injured drivers make medical claims, also known as PIP claims, with their own insurance companies. See Injured in a NJ Car Accident? – The Basics of Medical Benefit (PIP) Claims

Even though injured drivers make medical claims with their own car insurance companies, they can still bring NJ car accident lawsuits against the at-fault distracted drivers for other damages. See New Jersey Car Truck Accidents – What Can You Recover?

What NJ Car Accident Victims have to say about Philip Ciprietti, a NJ Car Accident Injury Lawyer

“Our calls were quickly returned and our questions promptly answered in regard to injuries sustained during a motor vehicle accident on Route 70 in Marlton, NJ. Not only did Phil address our legal issues, but he was also genuinely concerned for our physical recovery. Phil is and will always be our family attorney. – Ray and Terry Jeschon”

HELP AFTER A NJ CAR ACCIDENT.  FREE CONSULTATIONS. 800.281.8695

Philip Ciprietti has been helping injured victims for over 35 years and has helped many car, bus and truck accident victims in NJ. If you were injured in a car, truck or bus accident on the NJ Turnpike, AC Expressway or other New Jersey highways, feel free to contact Phil T. Ciprietti, Esquire for a free initial consultation. 800.281.8695

*Disclaimer: Every case is unique and you should not take any action or make decisions in your case without speaking to a qualified car and truck accident lawyer in New Jersey. This website page does not provide legal advice or create an attorney-client relationship. Use of the contact form on this website or emailing Mr. Ciprietti does not create any attorney-client relationship. In addition, confidential information should not be sent through the contact form.